Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.usj.es/handle/123456789/305

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dc.contributor.authorDíaz Pérez, F. J. -
dc.contributor.authorDíaz Martín, Ricardo-
dc.contributor.authorTrujillo, Francisco Javier Pérez-
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, Moises-
dc.contributor.authorGuardiola Mouhaffel, Ali Adib-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-20T13:22:14Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-20T13:22:14Z-
dc.date.issued2019-01-23-
dc.identifier.citationDíaz Pérez, F.J.; Díaz Martín, R.; Pérez Trujillo, F.J.; Díaz, M.; Mouhaffel, A.G. Consumption and Emissions Analysis in Domestic Hot Water Hotels. Case Study: Canary Islands. Sustainability 2019, 11, 599.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn20711050es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.usj.es/handle/123456789/305-
dc.descriptionWe analyze the energy consumption of domestic hot water (DHW) in the hotels of the archipelago of the Canary Islands (Spain). Currently, systems use fossil fuels of propane and gas oil. However, this paper analyzes several alternative systems which focus on renewable and mixed energies, such as biomass, solar thermal and heat pumps systems associated with an electric generation with photovoltaic solar panels for self-consumption. The carbon footprint generated is calculated for each method of generation of DHW. In our analysis, we demonstrate that by using a high-temperature heat pump with an average coefficient of performance (COP) equal to or greater than 4.4 associated with photovoltaic solar panels, a zero-emission domestic hot water system can be achieved, when the installation area of the photovoltaic solar panels is equal to that of the solar thermal system. The importance of DHW’s carbon footprint is proven, as is the efficiency of using high-temperature heat pumps associated with photovoltaic solar panels. As such, such mixed system suggests that the generation of DHW would have zero emissions with maximum annual savings according to hotel occupancy, between 112,417 and 137,644 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2), compared to current boilers based on fossil fuels.es_ES
dc.format.extent17 p.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPI AGes_ES
dc.rightsAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectHuella de carbonoes_ES
dc.subjectDHWes_ES
dc.subjectBiomasaes_ES
dc.subjectFotovoltaicoes_ES
dc.subjectSolar térmicaes_ES
dc.subjectBomba de calores_ES
dc.titleConsumption and emissions analysis in domestic hot water hotels. Case study: Canary Islandses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.subject.unescoBiomasaes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su11030599es_ES
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
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